How One NASA Intern Used Their “Rookie Smarts”

How One NASA Intern Used Their “Rookie Smarts”

You won’t believe what happened on the third day of Wolf Cukier’s short internship at NASA over the summer. This 17-year old high school student from Scarsdale, New York was given an assignment to check images from a super-strength satellite. That’s when it happened—and it surprised everyone, including Wolf. This teenager discovered a new planet. This yet to be discovered planet by scientists and astronomers was picked up by a teen when he noticed something strange through telescope images. It…

Read More Read More

How to Motivate Students Who Don’t Want Responsibility

How to Motivate Students Who Don’t Want Responsibility

My friend, Zach, told me about a recent project he gave to a freshman college student. Zach mentioned he’d heard me talk about how we must give ownership of a teen’s learning to them. So, he discussed this project with the student and saw his eyes light up when he added: “And you can decide how you want to solve this problem. I am leaving the methods totally up to you. It’s yours. You can ‘own’ this challenge.” I was…

Read More Read More

The Top Five Issues Generation Z & Millennials Say They Care About

The Top Five Issues Generation Z & Millennials Say They Care About

I asked an 18-year old high school senior what she cared about most. “I don’t just mean your family and friends,” I clarified. “I mean what issues and concerns do you think about most.” She blinked and stared at me for a moment, then replied, “No adult has ever asked me that question before.” Our interactions with focus groups reveal to us that middle school, high school, and college students believe adults do far more talking than we do listening…

Read More Read More

The Positives & Negatives of Youth Sports

The Positives & Negatives of Youth Sports

Youth sports is one of the most hotly debated topics among educators and parents today. Is sports good for kids? Is sports harmful to kids? I spoke to a mom recently who argued she will not let her son participate in organized sports leagues because of the amount of injuries and because “parents today are off the charts.” By this she meant that the adults involved have unhealthy priorities. At the same time, I know coaches who swear that sports…

Read More Read More

Are We Talking Too Much in Our Classrooms and Our Families?

Are We Talking Too Much in Our Classrooms and Our Families?

Last fall, I observed four high school classrooms in a single day. I saw four teachers offering instruction to four groups of students on four different subjects. After the first class, I made an observation and came up with an anecdotal hypothesis that I decided to test in the next three classrooms. I took my phone out and opened up the stopwatch app on it. Then, I clocked the number of minutes each faculty member consumed talking. Later I calculated…

Read More Read More

My Favorite Books I Read Last Year

My Favorite Books I Read Last Year

Almost every year, I post a handful of my favorite books I read the previous year. As you can see below, my list for 2019 was heavily weighted with leadership books, not just organizational, but personal leadership. The styles vary, and so do the authors. These are the books I was able to “eat the fish and spit out the bones”—and enjoy far more “fish” than “bones.” 1. The Ride of a Lifetime, by Bob Iger This autobiography of the…

Read More Read More

The Positives & Negatives of Video Games

The Positives & Negatives of Video Games

Rich and Susan have four sons ages 9, 11, 14, and 16. They are good parents who provide a loving home to their four boys, but when I spoke to them recently, they echoed a concern so many parents are voicing today: “We don’t know what to do with our kids’ video game addictions.” To clarify, Rich and Susan are not prone to use hyperbole. They are not dramatic in their verbiage nor are they prone to exaggerate—so when they…

Read More Read More

Nine Leadership Traits We See in Generation Z

Nine Leadership Traits We See in Generation Z

This past month, even more protestors got arrested by Hong Kong police. You likely saw the story on the news. But do you understand what’s really going on? Technically, Hong Kong belongs to China but is under an agreement called “One Country, Two Systems.” Mainland China is very authoritarian. Hong Kong is a semi-autonomous region and is supposed to enjoy democratic freedoms such as the right to vote, free speech, freedom of the press, and to conduct free enterprise. And…

Read More Read More

How 2019 Impacted Our Students

How 2019 Impacted Our Students

We not only just finished another year—we just completed another decade. Some of the “firsts” that happened over the last decade are remarkable: The first non-political candidate won the presidency — Donald Trump. Facebook became more valuable than AT&T, General Electric, and Citigroup combined. Same-sex marriage became legal. American unemployment fell to 3.5%. Disney bought three more huge entertainment companies. Great Britain decided to leave the European Union. The U.S. became the top energy producer in the world. The Chicago…

Read More Read More

Why Your New Year’s Resolution May Do More Harm than Good

Why Your New Year’s Resolution May Do More Harm than Good

I know it sounds cliché, but most American s who make a New Year’s resolution have dropped it by the month of February. 80 percent of us will downright fail to keep them at all. They look good in January—but not so much in June. Gym memberships skyrocket at the beginning of the year, and plummet in the following months. But why? I love setting and pursuing goals. It lights me up, like it does many people. There will be…

Read More Read More