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Seven Gifts Leaders Should Give Their Team This Holiday Season

Seven Gifts Leaders Should Give Their Team This Holiday Season

My mother always enjoyed the Christmas season. Ever since I can remember, she’d want to pull out the decorations as early as possible and get them up. My dad always said she’d have them up all year round if he’d let her. My mom, Sally, passed away fourteen years ago, and I miss her to this day. I think of her often, especially during this season of the year. What I recall most was she loved giving gifts to others.

I got that same spirit from my mother.

May I invite you to relax for a moment and review seven gifts I believe everyone wants from their leader? Most of you reading this lead something—your family, your sports team, your classroom, a department, a school, or a workplace. I also assume many of you reading this article serve under a leader. You can see both sides of this equation. The following are a handful of gifts everyone wants from their leader that we can and should give ALL year-round.

Seven Gifts People Want From Their Leader:

1. Peace – We talk about this every December: peace on earth, good will toward men. I believe we all want this. All team members wish for a healthy, secure, non-toxic work environment where peace of mind rules the day. For some, it will be a rare gift.

2. Direction – You may not believe it, but your team actually wants clear guidance on where you’re going and what they should prioritize. This doesn’t mean we micro-manage them, but rather guide them toward clear objectives. It’s a gift we all need.

3. Appreciation – Surveys show that leaders believe they express appreciation more than their teams feel they do. It’s difficult to overdo this one. Communicating appreciation shows both recognition and empathy toward them. People crave this.

4. Time – Most team members would enjoy a meal or a conversation, where they get time with their leader, just to interact about life. Because your team knows you’re busy, this especially stands out when you give it. Stop, listen, smile, eat and talk.

5. Joy – I believe a fun and joy-filled environment can be fostered by good leaders. In our workplace, we even have a rec room, where we give team members “recess” to take time and play ping pong or cornhole. We laugh a lot and celebrate each other.

6. Responsiveness – This is another skill that leaders assume they do better than their teams believe they do. Most team members do better when there’s consistent and clear feedback from their leader: do they meet expectations? Are they in your favor?

7. Love – Yes, I just said that. I believe communicating healthy love for your team (not in a strange, inappropriate way, but a caring way) is a game-changer for people. Most of us find it difficult to do this without being awkward, but folks need it and want it.

May you find ways to give these gifts, not only in December but each day next year.

The post Seven Gifts Leaders Should Give Their Team This Holiday Season appeared first on Growing Leaders.

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Four Ways to Practice Emotional Intelligence During the Holidays

Four Ways to Practice Emotional Intelligence During the Holidays

Almost every one of us will spend time with family or friends over the holiday season. We “push pause” on our busy lives and spend time with others with no agenda except exchanging gifts and consuming food.

Well, except for millions of families.

I have noticed when families gather during the holidays and aren’t busy with their jobs or with a football game—they are forced to reveal their true selves. Our “insides” come out. In fact, I’ve been intrigued over the years with how many people tend to hide behind their work only to disclose their emotional deficits when they aren’t on the job. Some of those family members or friends do have an agenda—and will exhibit traits that reveal their insecurities:

  • Many will feel the need to project their self-worth. Uncle Harry or cousin Ben will do a “humble brag” about how busy they are or what they’ve accomplished this year.
  • Others will withdraw from people and grow quiet, just biding time. They are introverts who don’t appreciate the “crowds” even when they’re people those introverts love.
  • Still, others will display passive-aggressive behaviors because they harbor some ill feelings toward a sibling or parent or aunt… and it erupts when certain topics arise.
  • Others still will find it necessary to convince everyone of their political opinion or of the latest gadget they just bought, feeling better if they can persuade anyone to join them.

What Should We Do?

Kids watch adults do this all the time. It’s no wonder they still act like children when they’re in their twenties. They’ve watched many current adults act like children and figure it’s normal.

I believe the holidays are a perfect time to model for the kids and young adults what healthy relationships—emotionally intelligent relationships—can look like. Consider what the kids in Generation Z have witnessed from too many of today’s adults:

  • Terrorist acts globally.
  • Mass shootings domestically.
  • Polarization among leaders politically.
  • Greed and embezzlement in corporations.
  • People quitting friendships, marriages, and work quickly.
  • Outrage on social media platforms over anyone who disagrees.

According to the Center for Creative Leadership, “75 percent of careers are derailed for reasons related to emotional competencies, including an inability to handle interpersonal problems; unsatisfactory team leadership during times of difficulty or conflict; or the inability to adapt to change or elicit trust.” I believe the same is true for family relationships.

I have a question. What if we demonstrated high emotional intelligence for our kids, nephews, nieces, and grandchildren? What if we entered every conversation authentically with:

  1. Nothing to prove.
  2. Nothing to hide.
  3. Nothing to lose.

What if we showed our kids what it means to connect with someone for the sole purpose of demonstrating love, belief, and affirmation? Let me suggest four holiday EQ actions for you.

1. Active listening

When someone’s speaking, genuinely tune in to what they’re saying and volley back with remarks that prove you’ve taken their words to heart. What if you didn’t try to outdo what they just said, but affirmed what they said? What if your goal was not to tell anyone anything this holiday season but to digest what everyone is saying? Ernest Hemingway was famous for saying, “When people talk, listen completely. Most people never listen.” You will find that listening is often just as emotionally taxing as talking. But it remembers that people’s favorite voice to hear is their own.

2. Social awareness

This quality enables you to spot what’s really happening in a room full of people. Who is connecting with who, and who’s slowly becoming disconnected? Practicing social awareness means you keep your emotional antennas up. This enables you to see not only the need to refresh someone’s drink, but to engage a person standing in a corner who has slipped into a gaze and has left the conversation. Small gestures—as simple as a knowing wink—can trigger connection. Families need people who are socially aware.

3. Removal of distractions

What if you deliberately placed your smartphone on silent or better yet, removed it from the room where you’re interacting. Studies have shown that the mere presence of a cell phone (even on silent) can distract people conversing. “Emotional intelligence is the ability to sense, understand, and effectively apply the power and acumen of emotions as a source of human energy.” Michael Porter said, “The essence of strategy is choosing what not to do.” Removing cell phones will liberate a holiday.

4. Selfless service

Theodore Roosevelt said it first: “No one cares how much you know until they know how much you care.” During Christmas or Hanukkah, what better time to demonstrate you care than by quietly and anonymously serving the other people in the house? Try looking for needs to meet or problems to solve; what if you assumed the role of the “host” even if you’re not at your own home? What if you acted as the concierge for the gathering, without announcing it?

“Too often we underestimate the power of a touch, a smile, a kind word, a listening ear, an honest compliment, or the smallest act of caring, all of which have the potential to turn a life around,” said Leo Buscaglia. What our kids need during this time is a model of what emotional intelligence and social intelligence looks like from those who are older. That’s me. That’s you.

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Six Steps to Move Students from Cynicism to Optimism

Six Steps to Move Students from Cynicism to Optimism

It was exactly 50 years ago that the Internet was born. In the fall of 1969, two letters were typed and transmitted online, forever altering the way knowledge, information, and communication happens among humans.

On Oct. 29, 1969, Leonard Kleinrock, a professor of computer science at UCLA and his grad student, Charley Kline, sent a transmission from UCLA’s computer to a computer at Stanford University’s Research Institute through ARPANET, the forerunner to what we now call the internet. ARPANET connected universities that worked with the department of defense, now called DARPA. That year, just four universities even had computers. They were room-sized contraptions that required an air conditioner under the floor to keep them from overheating.

Believe it or not, the message Kleinrock sent was actually an accident. He meant to send the word, “login” but only got two letters out, L and O, before the system crashed. No more words or letters were sent. Today, people now recall the message as “Hello” or “L-O.” It took an hour to send the transmission, but by then, LO was cemented in history as the first message ever sent as electronic mail. One hour was far shorter than the time receivers had to wait for a letter in the mail, and it would be years before the first fax machine could send and receive messages in real time. The typo was a breakthrough.

Two years later, the first official email was sent by MIT researcher Ray Tomlinson and also the first time the “@” sign was used to designate a specific recipient of a message. The World Wide Web didn’t come along for another 20 years, in 1989, when we began to build websites and communicate through them.

Little did we know the era that was about to begin.

What This Era Has Done to Students

I don’t know many people who wish we’d never entered the world of the internet. It’s made our communication faster, our work more efficient, and our lives more convenient. In retrospect, most of us would agree life is better in this age.

At the same time, Generation Z (today’s students) are growing up with a downside.

One of the unintended consequences of this “information age” is cynicism. We know the downside of every news report; we hear the dark side of every hero’s story; and we’re exposed to fake news as well as real news. In short, we know too much at an early age.

Journalist Deborah Stachelski reminds us, “The spiral of negativity into cynical feelings [is fostered] when we see our Facebook or Instagram friends excelling or enjoying life in ways that we aren’t, or can’t.” Even though some of the information we consume is not “bad news” it’s just too much news. It’s an overwhelming amount of information. What we didn’t know until recently is that too much information tends to make our brains skeptical and jaded. It’s one reason why a young child is typically innocent, full of wonder and trust. As we age and become informed, we also become the opposite—less trusting, less innocent, and less imaginative. We mock. We get sarcastic. We sneer.

Why? Because we’re skeptical.

Six Steps to Move Students from Cynicism to Optimism

Here are some action steps you can take with students to lessen the cynicism and raise the optimism in this information and intelligence age.

1. Help them practice imagining the best-case scenario, not just the worst.

Encourage them to refuse to let the unknown paralyze them. Empower them to write down their best possible moments from their past as a starting point. If they bring up potential negative scenarios, request they also talk about positive ones.

2. Help them become a producer, not just a consumer.

People who are producing—not merely consuming—are more prone to see the glass half full. The person who is rowing the boat has less time to rock the boat. Get your students involved in solving a problem or doing something positive daily.

3. Enable them to focus on their strengths and what they can do about a problem.

This idea is kin to number two above. Once your students identify their strengths, focus on how they can use them to solve problems and serve people. It’s hard to be apathetic or complacent when using your talents for a worthwhile cause.

4. Take them places where they can see solutions in progress.

Negative people have either neglected to consider all the positive improvements being made in the world, or they have never seen it. One way to turn cynicism into optimism is to observe or participate in projects where progress is being made.

5. Agree to a limit on social media time and too much comparison.

As I mentioned above, part of our negativity is we see others staging fun activities, and we begin to compare our lives to theirs. Two-hour daily limits for social media is the recommendation of psychologist Jean Twenge to reduce negative emotions.

6. Hold a competition to smile more and greet more people each day.

This is one sure-fire way to become more optimistic. Choose to smile and choose to say hello to people, even strangers, every day. If possible, make it a competition between you and the students. Sometimes attitudes really do follow actions.

The post Six Steps to Move Students from Cynicism to Optimism appeared first on Growing Leaders.

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Ophthalmologists using Xenon and lasers

Ophthalmologists using Xenon and lasers

Marks will be applied equally to each of (a) and (b).
(a) Before the 1970s, ophthalmologists had to use traditional light sources (e.g. xenon-arc incandescent light source) for retinal photocoagulation. Now they use lasers.
Compare the two technologies, discussing the advantages / disadvantages of each.
(b) Discuss three different types of laser currently used in ophthalmology, providing information about the physical properties of each one and explaining precisely why that particular laser is clinically necessary / useful.

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Four Ways Parents Reduce Gratitude in Their Kids

Four Ways Parents Reduce Gratitude in Their Kids

I recently witnessed three teenage girls at a shopping village with their mom. They were Christmas shopping and completely caught up in the season. As they interacted, I heard the teens getting louder and louder. Without trying, I began to hear what they were talking about. Each of them felt they deserved certain gifts from their grandparents; one mentioned how she could not live without an Anthropologie outfit and another how she needed several sets of clothes for the various parties she’d be attending. They grew upset when things didn’t go exactly as they thought they should.

What struck me was how their mother actually fostered this attitude. The girls showed no trace of gratitude for the lifestyle they enjoyed; mom showed no sign of cultivating gratitude along with their sense of entitlement. She seemed to agree with their assumptions.

Quietly, I wondered if these girls experienced a mild sense of unhappiness.

What Too Many Parents Do By Accident

I believe millions of moms and dads actually reduce an attitude of gratitude in their children each and every day by the way we lead them. Instead of gratitude, we find a growing sense of resentment and entitlement among American adolescents. It’s sad, but too often, it’s our fault. Gratitude doesn’t bloom unless we cultivate it.

And Generation Z desperately needs us to do just that.

“One of the most robust findings in the field of positive psychology is on the benefits of gratitude. It helps stave off depression, evokes positive emotions in others, and increases well-being,” says psychologist Nancy Darling. So… what reduces gratitude?

Four Ways Parents Reduce Gratitude in Kids

1. Giving them more than they need… and acting as though they need it.

Whenever possessions and perks are treated as assumptions, it tends to decrease a person’s gratitude. In other words, if I think I deserve everything I have, I’ll likely not be as thankful as if I treat them as gifts. When our children were growing up, my wife and I taught them that having anything beyond food, clothes and a roof over our heads—is a bonus. We didn’t do it to make them feel guilty, but to help them feel grateful. I took them on trips to serve the urban poor and to serve people in developing nations. It gave us perspective on what’s normal and what’s a bonus. To be clear—we can actually reduce gratitude in kids when we offer more than they need, and we don’t talk about the “extras” as an added gift. My parents grew up during the Great Depression and led us to treat everything we had as a gift. I attempted to do the same with our kids, and while they enjoy more than I did, my son (especially) is always expressing thanks and is a minimalist as a young professional.

2. Fostering a sense of entitlement instead of a work ethic.

While a sense of gratitude is not the opposite of a sense of entitlement, it’s very close to an antonym. We foster our kids’ sense of entitlement by giving them what they should earn; by assuming they deserve all the latest gadgets and portable devices; and by not instructing them to communicate gratitude for gifts, favors, perks and other benefits. Along the way, they begin to feel they don’t need to say thanks. After all, they deserve all these blessings. One of the most efficient methods of cultivating a sense of gratitude is to build a strong work ethic in them—teaching them through experience how to work for what they want. Along the way, they recognize the value of waiting and working—and can appreciate it when someone does the same for them. Gratitude and work ethic often go hand in hand. Failing to build this frequently results in ingratitude.

3. Focusing on materialistic rather than intrinsic goals.

Psychologist Jean Twenge discovered a correlation between the materialistic culture we currently experience and the sadness we often see in students. When parents, teachers, coaches and other leaders focus on material (external) goods, it creates a lens that values material possessions over internal qualities. And I believe materialism goes hand-in-hand with ingratitude. There isn’t a causality relationship, but there is a correlation. When our focus is materialistic “things” we drift from being grateful for the things that actually matter and satisfy us. It has been said, “Too many people buy things they don’t need with money they don’t have to impress people they don’t even like.” We develop gratitude when we focus on items that money cannot purchase.

4. Failing to express gratitude yourself.

When we take positive elements in our life for granted and neglect to express thanks for those blessings, we actually reduce the likelihood of gratitude in our kids. People do what people see. James Baldwin wrote, “Children have never been good at listening to their elders but they have never failed to imitate them.” The best way to reduce gratitude in young people is to fail to express gratitude yourself. The surest way to expand gratitude is to live an ongoing grateful life. No lecture necessary. I have found that my mother’s constant grateful spirit—even over the smallest of blessings—has turned me into the same kind of person. One of my college dormmates once said to me, “You’d make a good poor person.” I think that backhanded compliment meant that he saw me as a person who got excited about even small benefits that came my way.

This holiday season, let’s avoid the list above and begin a habit of gratitude. It’s attractive.

The post Four Ways Parents Reduce Gratitude in Their Kids appeared first on Growing Leaders.

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Ethical Violation

Ethical Violation

For this assignment, you will utilize an academic online Library to locate an article that discusses a specific incident of ethical violations on the part of a police or corrections officer. The article must include a real case relating to an officer who did not adhere to his or her agency’s code of ethics.

The article should be no more than 5 years old, and the article should have been published via a reputable source (e.g., peer-reviewed journal, law enforcement organization, or industry source). Once you identify the article, you may need to do further research as you complete the following two parts for your case study.

1.First, provide an analysis of the case, to include a summary of the circumstances, suspected ethical violations, and the final outcome of the case. Your analysis should include how non-law-enforcement personnel or organizations in this case influenced the ethics of the officer.

2.Second, assume that you are a criminal justice administrator, and a similar incident happened under your command. Discuss any changes or actions that you would take regarding implementing and enforcing the code of ethics as well as the communication you would have with your subordinates to ensure this does not happen again in your agency. Discuss how to prevent non-law-enforcement personnel or organizations from influencing the ethics of your criminal justice professionals.

Your case study should present an insightful and thorough analysis with strong arguments and evidence that incorporate concepts learned in this unit. The case study must be a minimum of three pages in length, not counting the title page and references page. A minimum of three sources will be used, one of which must come from an academic online Library. All sources used should be properly cited. The case study, including all references, should be formatted in APA Style.

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Time’s 2019 Person of the Year Is a Teenager

Time’s 2019 Person of the Year Is a Teenager

Have you heard of Greta Thunberg? In many ways, she’s a typical 16-year old student from Sweden. She’s an adolescent on social media who wants to change the world.

The big difference is—she actually is changing the world right now.

Greta was just named TIME magazine’s 2019 Person of the Year. Yep. She’s the youngest person to ever win the award. In the words straight from TIME, we read why she won:

Thunberg began a global movement by skipping school: starting in August 2018, she spent her days camped out in front of the Swedish Parliament, holding a sign painted in black letters on a white background that read Skolstrejk för klimatet: ‘School Strike for Climate.’ In the 16 months since, she has addressed heads of state at the U.N., met with the Pope, sparred with the President of the United States and inspired 4 million people to join the global climate strike on September 20, 2019, in what was the largest climate demonstration in human history.”

The Unlikely Teenage Leader

Ironically, Greta looks like what lasting leaders have looked like for centuries. They just usually don’t demonstrate this kind of strength and conviction so young. She is 16 years old, but she looks 12. She’s barely five feet tall. She has auburn hair, parted in the middle. She has Asperger’s Syndrome, meaning she doesn’t share the same emotional register as most people she meets. Journalists Charlotte Alter, Suyin Haynes and Justin Worland describe Greta this way: “She dislikes crowds; ignores small talk; and speaks in direct, uncomplicated sentences. She cannot be flattered or distracted. She is not impressed by other people’s celebrity, nor does she seem to have an interest in her own growing fame. But these very qualities have helped make her a global sensation.” Greta stands by her convictions regardless of the cost.

Wow. That does sound a little like Joan of Arc…or…Rosa Parks…or…Mother Teresa.

Four Qualities That Make This Teen a Leader Worth Following

1. She embraces long-term thinking.

“We can’t just continue living as if there was no tomorrow, because there is a tomorrow,” she says, tugging on the sleeve of her blue sweatshirt. “That is all we are saying.” Greta sees the world far into the future and cares about the world she’ll leave to her children. In fact, she’s frustrated that current politicians haven’t done more to plan ahead. She feels it’s as if all they care about is staying in office today. She says we must act today to save tomorrow.

2. She influences the influencers.

It all began when she traveled to her nation’s capital. In the next 18 months, she addressed heads of state at the United Nations, met with the Pope and sparred with President Trump. She’s interfaced with leaders on social media, and inspired millions to join her in taking a stand for climate change. She knew her movement would only catch on if she influenced those in positions of influence. In response, nations have begun to act to remove their carbon footprint.

3. She is bold.

“Thunberg arrived in front of the Swedish Parliament on August 20, 2018, wearing a blue hoodie and carrying a homemade school-strike sign. She had no institutional support, no formal backing and nobody to keep her company. But doing something—taking a stand, even when alone—felt better than doing nothing. ‘Learning about climate change triggered my depression in the first place,’ she says. ‘But it was also what got me out of my depression, because there were things I could do to improve the situation. I don’t have time to be depressed anymore.”

4. She possesses moral authority.

“I see the world in black and white, and I don’t like compromising,” she said earlier this year. “If I were like everyone else, I would have continued on and not seen this crisis.” She practices what she preaches, when many politicians hide behind their words. Millions now follow Greta in this movement. In fact, when an environmental leader from Belgium chided her—it caused an outcry of support for Greta and the Belgium leader was forced to resign.

The Bottom Line

Whether you agree with her beliefs or strategy, Greta Thunberg leads the largest youth movement on the planet. She is a model for youth activists around the world who are also fighting for causes ranging from gun control (Florida) to democratic representation (Hong Kong). But, consider the facts that make this leader so different. Know any students like this?

  • She is a teenager.
  • She has Asperger’s syndrome.
  • She’s short at about 5 feet tall.
  • She struggles with depression.
  • She dresses humbly, not glamorously.
  • She wants to change the world.

“This moment does feel different,” said former Vice President Al Gore, who won the Nobel Peace Prize for his climate advocacy work. “Throughout history, many great morally based movements have gained traction at the very moment when young people decided to make that movement their cause.”

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Discussion Homework Help

Discussion Homework Help

Discuss the presentation that you reviewed. If there were multiple presentations you reviewed, what interested you?

This Discussion will not be in groups so that you can read all students comments in class who may have reviewed your presentation. If you waited until the last minute to share your presentation, it may not have gotten peer reviewed. Don’t worry, I will read them all and provide feedback. I may also ask if you would allow me to share with other classes. The Padlet Fire 73 Adobe Spark Preview is where your presentations will exist. Click the box with the arrow in the upper right hand corner to go to the page. Here is a link you can use to get to our Padlet page (Links to an external site.) as well. Only people in the class can see these presentations and is by having the following password: Fire73_0158_2019

My presentation, Juan Calderon.

Discuss the following questions or create your own discussion from your observations.

answears must be atleast 120 words

  1. Discuss the presentation you peer reviewed in Adobe Spark and what interested you about the topic. Was it the title, the title page picture, or the content?
  2. Add any additional helpful information that the presenter may want to add to the presentation and why, or the presenter covered the topic well.

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Classical Ethics Homework Help

Classical Ethics Homework Help

1) Read Plato’s Meno dialogue and write a 1-2 pg. response paper (typed, 12-pt. font, double-spaced). Pick at least one definition that Meno provides for virtue and explain. Does Socrates approve of the definition(s) you have chosen? Why or why not? Is there a definition of virtue presented in the dialogue that you favor? If so, then explain why you think this definition is preferable to (at least one) of the other definitions. If you cannot decide which definition of virtue that you prefer, then which definition do you believe Plato (the author of the dialogue) is defending? Why? Due December 17 at 11:59 PM

2) Read Plato’s Crito dialogue and write a 1-2 pg. response paper (typed, 12-pt. font, double-spaced). What are some of the reasons that Socrates gives Crito for not escaping from prison? Are these good reasons? Is Socrates convincing? Why or why not? Also, Socrates provides a long list of reasons and arguments for choosing to stay behind, but is it possible that these reasons can all be reduced to one underlying principle? That is, does Socrates seem to be guided throughout the dialogue by a fundamental rule/law? If so, then what do you think this fundamental principle is? Explain. Due December 18 at 11:59 PM

3)Read the selection from Aristotle’s Nicomachean Ethics and write a 1-2 pg. response (typed, 12-pt. font, double-spaced). How does Aristotle define happiness? How does he distinguish his definition of happiness from other possible definitions? What do you understand by the term “happiness”, and how is this different from Aristotle’s conception? Do you think that Aristotle’s usage of the word is different from (or similar to) the way in which “happiness” is typically used today? Explain. Due December 19 at 11:59 PM

4) Please choose ONE of the prompts provided and write a detailed essay that fully addresses ALL of its questions/objectives. Your essay will be graded on accuracy, comprehension, logic, clarity, and originality

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Comparative analysis of stratification systems

Comparative analysis of stratification systems

This writing assignment has two parts with a combined word count of 1,000-1,500 words.

Part One

  1. Complete a comparative analysis of stratification systems.
  2. Choose at least three stratification systems. One must be the class system.
  3. Describe the social mobility of each stratification system.
  4. Explain how individuals are sorted within the systems.

Part Two

  1. View the charts and graphs in Our Social World: An Introduction to Sociology, Chapter 8
  2. Compare males by race, class, and education with Females by race, class, and education.
  3. What do you find by doing this analysis? What do your findings show about stratification between these groups?
  4. Describe which gender and race category has the most power and why.

1 hour agoREQUIREMENTS

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